Female Sexual Desire: An Evolutionary Biology Perspective

One perspective on sex differences in libido.

“Ultimately, it is the desire, not the desired, that we love.” ― Friedrich Nietzsche

In recent weeks there has been a flurry(link is external) of interest(link is external) surrounding the topic of female sexual desire, stemming largely from the publication and surrounding publicity of a book called What Do Women Want? Adventures in the Science of Female Desire (link is external)by Daniel Bergner(link is external). Bergner followed the book’s publication with a widely read New York Times Magazine piece(link is external) focused on the medical treatment of women with low libido.

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Canada: Rickets on the rise for aboriginal children in the North

Doctor says public health’s efforts to stop resurgence ‘abysmal failure’

By CBC News

Rates of rickets continue to rise among aboriginal children in the North, a trend that has researchers increasingly concerned.

Dr. Leanne Ward, who works with the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario in Ottawa, did a 2007 study examining rates of rickets in aboriginal children in the Northwest Territories, Yukon, Nunavut and Alaska between the ages of one and two.

The study found incidences of rickets that were six to 12 times higher than the rest of Canada, a trend that Ward says hasn’t changed.

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New technique fights aging, extends life of cultured human cells

The high vulnerability of cultured adult stem cells has posed a big problem for microbiological research. But a new technique, developed by Stanford scientists, can extend the life of cultured cells and offer clues to solving diseases and prolonging life.

The technique can quickly increase the length of human telomeres, the protective caps on the ends of chromosomes. As a result, the treated cells behave as if they are much younger and multiply with abandon in the laboratory dish – rather than stagnating and dying. Normally, telomeres shorten with each cell division, and this is the reason a cell eventually dies.

Now we have found a way to lengthen human telomeres by as much as 1,000 nucleotides, turning back the internal clock in these cells by the equivalent of many years of human life,”said Helen Blau, PhD, professor of microbiology and immunology at Sanford, in a statement. “This greatly increases the number of cells available for studies such as drug testing and disease modeling.”

Read more ⇒ http://rt.com/usa/228775-extending-life-human-cells/

New Research Reveals the Real Causes of Depression

By: Dr. Mercola

Depression is thought to affect about one in 10 Americans.1 In 2010, antidepressants were the second most commonly prescribed type of medication in the US,2 hinting at the severity of the problem.

Contrary to popular belief, depression is not likely caused by unbalanced brain chemicals; however there are a number of other biological factors that appear to be highly significant. Chronic inflammation is one. As noted in the featured article:3

“George Slavich, a clinical psychologist at the University of California in Los Angeles, has spent years studying depression, and has come to the conclusion that it has as much to do with the body as the mind.‘I don’t even talk about it as a psychiatric condition anymore,’ he says. ‘It does involve psychology, but it also involves equal parts of biology and physical health.’ The basis of this new view is blindingly obvious once it is pointed out: everyone feels miserable when they are ill. That feeling of being too tired, bored and fed up to move off the sofa and get on with life is known among psychologists as sickness behaviour.It happens for a good reason, helping us avoid doing more damage or spreading an infection any further. It also looks a lot like depression.”

One researcher even goes so far as to suggest depression should be rebranded as an infectious but non-contagious disease,4 while the author of the featured article playfully compares depression with an allergic reaction—in this case “an allergy to modern life”—considering the many environmental factors that are known to cause inflammation, from diet to toxic exposures and stress.

Scientists have also found that your mental health can be adversely impacted by factors such as vitamin D deficiency and/or unbalanced gut flora—both of which, incidentally, play a role in keeping inflammation in check, which is really what the remedy to depression is all about.

As discussed in an article by Dr. Kelly Brogan, depressive symptoms can be viewed as downstream manifestations of inflammation.

“The source itself may be singularly or multiply-focused as stress, dietary and toxic exposures, and infection… [I]nflammation appears to be a highly relevant determinant of depressive symptoms such as flat mood, slowed thinking, avoidance, alterations in perception, and metabolic changes,5she writes.

Certain biomarkers, such as cytokines in your blood and inflammatory messengers like CRP, IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, show promise as potential new diagnostic tools, as they’re “predictive6 and linearly7 correlative” with depression.

For example, researchers have found8 that melancholic depression, bipolar disorder, and postpartum depression, are associated with elevated levels of cytokines in combination with decreased cortisol sensitivity (cortisol is both a stress hormone and a buffer against inflammation). As explained by Dr. Brogan:

“Once triggered in the body, these inflammatory agents transfer information to the nervous system, typically through stimulation of major nerves such as the vagus, which connects9 the gut and brain. Specialized cells called microglia in the brain represent the brain’s immune hubs and are activated in inflammatory states. In activated microglia, an enzyme called IDO (indoleamine 2 3-dioxygenase) has been shown10 to direct tryptophan away from the production of serotonin and melatonin and towards the production of an NMDA agonist called quinolinic acid that may be responsible for symptoms of anxiety and agitation. These are just some of the changes that may conspire to let your brain in on what your body may know is wrong.”

Read more ⇒ The Mind Unleashed
Learn more ⇒http://themindunleashed.org/2015/01/new-research-reveals-real-causes-depression.html

Why ebola is so deadly

Comment by john1812

Viruses like the Ebola virus and HIV are different and more complex because they attack the immune system and its responses first.

For example, HIV as we all know attacks the immune system itself so that there is no immune system and the victims die from rare cancers or sicknesses that literally can’t be fought off.

Many of the West Africans, poor as they may be, are not starving and probably more healthy than many Americans, yet Ebola is still taking them down.

The Ebola virus actually invades the immune cells that trigger an immune response so that the body doesn’t know it’s there. Once the virus destroys these immune cells it’s entered the rest of the body in which case the immune system really doesn’t know what to do with it or where to go. As the Ebola virus spreads the immune system just goes crazy and other chemicals are released into the blood stream that weaken the vessels and lowers blood pressure. The virus also enters throughout the entire body destroying all tissue. Doctors who have handled Ebola/Marburg victims say the bodies after death continue on in this destruction phase in which the body literally turns jelly-like due to total cell destruction by the virus. That’s why it has such a high fatality rate.

Learn more » Natural News
http://www.naturalnews.com/047232_Ebola_natural_immunity_virus.html?utm_content=buffercf80b&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Quit Smoking: 7 Tips to make quitting easier

One BIG reason why it’s hard to kick the habit

People start smoking for lots of reasons. But it’s nicotine addiction that can make it so hard to quit. Almost immediately, you feel a rush as the nicotine takes hold. But soon after, you feel down and tired, causing you to crave that rush again. It becomes a vicious cycle.

The good news is that many people quit every day – and you have it in you to quit too. So read on about the many ways you can become a non-smoker.

Tip # 1- Make a list

List all the reasons why you want to quit and then keep the list close by for whn you’re thinking about lighting up.

Think of things like: Family and friends, Health, Self-image, Social life, Money

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